All Things Rise and Fall | By, Thomas Oppong

My mantra for staying sane through it all: rise with purpose, fall with wisdom, and repeat

Source: Medium

Author: Thomas Oppong

Rise, fall, repeat. It’s a cycle. Everything goes through a process. It’s the nature of things, even the things and experiences we love. My relationship with my family has evolved. I’m spending more time on meaningful experiences. My career has shifted from part-time writing to full-time writing. It’s been rising slowly, but there have been many dips.

My social life is no different. My relationships with friends have their ups and downs. Sometimes, we’re super close, sharing everything, and then life pulls us in different directions. But that doesn’t mean the connection is gone; it just means we’re in a different phase. I’m a lifelong learner, but not always deep. I don’t always read books. Sometimes, I read online essays and take courses. The “measure of the swing to the right” (intense learning) is balanced by the “measure of the swing to the left” (rest and reflection on what I’m learning).

In the end, both are necessary for growth.

My spiritual growth has gone from a single perception of truth to multiple thoughts, ideas and wisdom for life. I don’t get discouraged by the many falls I experience. The important thing is to get back on track when I can, knowing that progress isn’t always linear. I have accepted the natural flow of life. The challenges I face will eventually be met with periods of ease, and adjustments will eventually follow the good times. It’s all part of the complete life experience. The key is finding that sweet spot that is of equal measure on both sides to avoid burnout and stay productive.

Nothing is permanent“All things change, nothing is extinguished. There is nothing in the whole world which is permanent. Everything flows onward; all things are brought into being with a changing nature; the ages themselves glide by in constant movement. — Ovid

Jobs change, relationships evolve, and people move on. You, me, everything — we’re all part of life’s relentless rise and fall. We build careers, watch our families grow, invest in skills and experiences, and aim to make something beautiful with our lives. It’s exhilarating — that feeling of getting to the top, the world expanding before you. But, like a pendulum, the higher it swings, the steeper the inevitable fall. A career shift of unimaginable consequences, the people we love pass, and our bodies betray us with age. It’s a harsh truth, but understanding prepares you for change, something you can’t wish away.

The cycle is not punishment.

It’s flow. Tides rush in, then retreat, leaving treasures behind. “The flow of life is great. It directs you at all times. It flows through you and with you,” writes Laurie E. Smith in Spirit In Disguise. We rise, gather experiences, learn, and grow. Then, we painfully fall and lose what we hold in high esteem. We start over, releasing what no longer serves us and making space for the next tide. It’s a constant exchange. The key to inner peace, mental clarity, and escaping misery is to make space in our minds for both sides without clinging to them. Don’t cling to the good times or get discouraged by the bad ones. Anticipate the falls by building resilience. That’s how you get through hardships. The rise and fall can feel overwhelming at times, but the good and bad balance out in the end.

That’s how I’m surviving the rise and fall of life.

The fall humbles me.

It reminds me of my limits — the things I can control and those I can’t. It pushes me to adapt, to find new ways to rise. The “pendulum” of life will affect you one way or another. The only way out is to become wiser during your rise. Don’t get complacent. Prepare for the inevitable shift. Don’t be reckless. Build a solid foundation. Make better and deeper connections so that when the fall comes, it won’t shatter you. And when you’re down, you won’t stay there. Look for opportunities in the dip. Maybe it’s a chance to reassess, start fresh, or do things differently.

“Everything flows and nothing abides. Everything gives way and nothing stays fixed.” — Heraclitus

Rising and falling applies to almost everything.

You have a bad day, then a fantastic one. You feel energized, then exhausted. It’s a constant up and down. There will be periods of high energy and productivity (“out”) followed by times of rest and reflection (“in”). These cycles are natural and necessary. You can’t be “on” all the time. The body needs downtime to recover. There’s a natural balance to life’s experiences, I’ve found.

The greater the effort you put into one aspect of your life (work, relationships, meaningful downtime activities ), the greater the need to create space for its opposite (rest, relaxation, personal growth). When you’re in a productive phase, capitalize on it, but schedule downtime to avoid exhaustion. Similarly, during low periods, don’t force things. Focus on activities that replenish your energy.

But the intensity is different for everyone.

“Action and reaction, ebb and flow, trial and error, change — this is the rhythm of living. Out of our over-confidence, fear; out of our fear, clearer vision, fresh hope. And out of hope, progress.” — Bruce Barton

Learn to recognise these mini-cycles. There will be moments of doubt, fatigue, and frustration. Even our moods follow this flow. It’s not a sign of failure or weakness. When you’re feeling low, don’t get attached. The pendulum will inevitably swing back in your favour again soon enough.

My mantra for staying sane through it all: rise with purpose, fall with wisdom, and repeat.

Source: Medium

Author: Thomas Oppong

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